Symphonious

Living in a state of accord.

Kiss And Ride?

What the hell is a kiss and ride? I’ve heard of park and rides where you can drive a short distance from home then park and catch a train the rest of the way but a kiss and ride? I guess it’s a drop off point where you get your husband/wife (or in San Francisco your boyfriend) to drive you a short distance from home and then you catch the train and they drive home again. Still wouldn’t it be easier to call it a drop off point? Is it really that inconceivable that someone might be dropped off by someone they don’t want to kiss? Anyway, I’ve got to go find a good looking girl to give me a lift to the train station tomorrow…..
Category: JavaOne
  • Iain says:

    I’d loan you Kim, but I’m using her. Sorry.

    July 5, 2004 at 9:26 pm
  • DrBacchus says:

    If you find a good source, let me know.

    July 6, 2004 at 12:05 am
  • Nami says:

    “The Kiss & Ride is a designated area(identified by signs) for parents picking up or unloading their children by private vehicle. The area is separate from the bus loading/unloading location so there is no conflict with the two operations.”
    – from http://www.fcps.edu/fts/safety-security

    March 31, 2005 at 7:53 pm
  • rakslice says:

    The first time I saw the term “kiss and ride” was when I moved to the Toronto area in the early 90′s, on the signs for the multi-lane queue areas at commuter train stations, like this one in Oakville (it’s the long 7-lane thing that the map is centered on):

    http://maps.google.ca/maps?ll=43.45515,-79.683103&spn=0.001569,0.003659&t=h&om=1

    I just assumed it was only used for multi-lane queues (and not just, say, a curb lane pick-up/drop-off like at an airport.) It’s probably been in use for quite a while, since it appears on old-style TTC signs, like these ones pictured in the Cambridge Encyclopaedia of the English Language:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=Kh_RZhvHk0YC&pg=RA6-PA276&lpg=RA6-PA277&printsec=8&vq=kiss+and+ride&dq=Cambridge+Encyclopedia+of+the+English+Language&psp=w&sig=LsXZjxlXxMMTmsbonDvU2iVfNbU

    May 21, 2006 at 12:59 pm
  • Amber says:

    I saw a kiss and ride sign in Sydney Australia what does this mean

    April 30, 2009 at 4:44 am
  • David says:

    It’s not only in San Fransisco where you might have a boyfriend. I live in Sydney where I’ve had several :p

    A kiss and ride is a place mainly for parents to drop off or collect their kids in a designated zone.

    September 23, 2009 at 1:17 pm
  • Doug says:

    I guess this is just one of those things that I take for granted… the closest metro stop to my parent’s place growing up in the DC area labeled the drop-off area as such so it’s always made sense to me, but now here I find myself looking for any other possible names people might refer to such an area for work and I find that this phrase is perplexing people around the globe! I guess it’s just a North American thing that not all Europeans, Aussies, Taiwanese and Japanese might are ready for.

    Oh, and I wouldn’t say that it’s mainly for parents dropping off kids – apparently the etymology of the phrase has it originally coming from an LA Times article talking about a wife dropping her husband off at the station, which is honestly more the image I’ve always had.

    Anyway I say more kissing, with or without the ride. On second thought, yeah I’ll take the ride too, thanks.

    January 14, 2010 at 8:52 am
  • Brent says:

    I was visiting Prague the other day and saw a sign for this. Had no idea what it meant, just thought it was some freaky European thing lol.

    March 19, 2012 at 12:37 pm
  • Eryn says:

    Brent, you’re not the only one with this problem. I live in Prague and I haven’t a clue what this is xD

    August 19, 2012 at 7:06 pm

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