Symphonious

Living in a state of accord.

Static and Dynamic Languages

I do a lot of coding in Java and JavaScript and it’s never bothered me that one has static types and one dynamic (and I’ve used plenty of other languages from both camps as well – it amuses me slightly that the two I use most often tend to be viewed as the worst examples of each type). I can see pros and cons of both approaches – static typing detects a bunch of common errors sooner which saves time but there are inevitably times where you wind up just fighting the type system which wastes time again. Better statically typed languages waste less of your time but at some point they all cause pain that’s avoided with dynamic languages. It winds up coming down largely to personal preference and is a little affected by what you’re building.

What I have learnt however is that using static and dynamic languages too closely is a recipe for pain and frustration. LMAX develops the main exchange in Java and recently started using Spock for unit tests. Spock is amazing in many, many ways but it comes with the Groovy programming language which is dynamically typed. There isn’t, or perhaps shouldn’t be, any tighter coupling than a class and its unit test so the combination of static and dynamic typing in this case is extremely frustrating.

It turns out that the way I work with languages differs depending on the type system – or rather on the tools available but they are largely affected by the type system. In Java I rename methods without a second thought, safe in the knowledge that the IDE will find all references and rename them. Similarly I can add a parameter to an API and then let the compiler find all the places I need to update. Once there are unit tests in Groovy however neither of those options is completely safe (and using the compiler to find errors is a complete non-starter).

When writing JavaScript I’m not under any illusion that the IDE will find every possible reference for me so I approach the problem differently. I explore using searches rather than compiler errors and turn to running tests to identify problems more quickly because the compiler isn’t there to help. I also tend to write tests different, expecting that they will need to cover things that the compiler would otherwise have picked up. The system design also changes subtly to make this all work better.

With static and dynamic typing too closely mixed, the expectations and approaches to development become muddled and it winds up being a worst-of-both-worlds approach. I can’t count on the compiler helping me out anymore but I still have to spend time making it happy.

That doesn’t mean that static and dynamic languages can’t co-exist on the same project successfully, just that they need a clearly defined, and relatively stable, interface between them. The most common example being static typing on the server and JavaScript in the browser, in which case the API acts as a buffer between the two. It could just as easily be server to server communication or a defined module API between the two though and still work.

Category: General

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