Symphonious

Living in a state of accord.

Replacing Symlinks with Hardlinks

Symlinks have been causing me grief lately.  Our build tool, buck, loves creating symlinks but publishes corrupt cache artefacts for any build rule that includes a symlink amongst it’s output.

We also wind up calling out to npm to manage JavaScript dependencies and it has an annoying (for us) habit of resolving symlinks when processing files and then failing to find required libraries because the node_modules folder was back where the symlink was, not with the original file. Mostly this problem is caused by buck creating so many symlinks.

So it’s useful to be able to get rid of symlinks which can be done with the handy -L or –dereference option to cp. Then instead of copying the symlink you copy the file it points to. Avoids all the problems with buck and npm but wastes lots of disk space and means that changes to the original file are no longer reflected in the new copy (so watching files doesn’t work).

Assuming our checkout is on a single file system (which seems reasonable) we can get the best of both worlds by using hard links.  cp has a handy option for that too -l or –link. But since buck gave us a symlink to start with it just gives us a hard link to the symlink that points to the original file.

So combining the two options, cp -Ll, should be exactly what we want. And if you’re using coreutils 8.25 or above it is. cp will dereference the symlink and create a hard link to the original file. If you’re using coreutils prior to 8.25 cp will just copy the symlink. Hitting a bug in coreutils is pretty much the definition of the world being out to get you.

Fortunately, we can work around the issue with a bit of find magic:

find ${DIR} -type l -exec bash -c 'ln -f "$(readlink -m "$0")" "$0"' {} \;

‘find -type l’ will find all symlinks.  For each of those we execute some bash, reading from inside out, to deference the symlink with readlink -m then use ln to create a hard link with the -f option to force it to overwrite the existing symlink.

Good times…